Art Gallery

Aboriginal, Australian and contemporary art, prints and sporting memorabilia....

Art Gallery

Gallop-Thru-Time  Gallery stock a very large range of aboriginal art, many works on canvas, small to very large in size. Works on paper also make up part of our stock. Aboriginal artists; Barney Ellega, Ningura Napurrula, Amy Johnson, Gillian Daniels, Adriana Robinson, Kenneth Wark, Brett White, are only some of the artists work we stock. We also have a collection of Australian art on offer, works by Bonnie Stephens, Gillian Banks, Sonya Hart, Kathleen Donald, Jan (Milner) Cole and many more. Further information can be obtained through our email address.

Prices and Purchasing....

Prices for all aboriginal art are on application, just simply send an email or contact us by phone outlining the pieces of interest and we will release all relevant details including post/pack if required.

Adriana Robinson
 
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Amy Johnson
 
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Amy Johnson Jirwulurr was born around 1953 in the Ngukurr region, Northern Territory. Amy is widowed to the late Sambo Bara Bara and still resides at Ngukurr with her extended family. From time to time she paints at the Ngukurr Arts Centre; this exposure has promoted her career and has won her many awards. Amy is recognised for her naive and joyful depictions of the plant and animal life found in the local landscape and billabong regions near Ngukurr in southern Arnhem Land. Her mastery of colour and strong graphic technique is the major influence of her late husband Sambo Burra Burra. Together they were founding members of the Ngukurr painting movement that began in 1987 with lessons in acrylic painting. It was during this period that the mixture of culturally diverse and distinctive artists redefined notions of traditional art from the remote north. Generally the images of totemic animals in Amy's painting can be understood as representing an inherited law from her husband. Many animals are associated with secret songs, involving the search for sacred sites to enact the rituals surrounding circumcision and mortuary ceremonies. This right accompanied by her deep love and appreciation of her homeland and an awareness of the intricate cycles of plant and animal life is manifested in her work. These works reflect innocence and happiness as well as bright colours, which have become one of Jirwulurr's trademarks. Ngukurr, where Amy is from, was formerly a Mission Station established by the Church of England Mission Society in 1908 on the Roper River and was known as the Roper River Mission. The Church was replaced by a Government agency in 1968 and its name was changed to Ngukurr, which means 'a place of many stones'.
Barney Ellega
 
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Barney Ellaga was born around 1939 in the desert near Warburton, Western Australia. His father was an Alawa man and his mother, a Ngalakan speaker from Arnhem Land. Ellaga comes from Mamballi country to the south of the Roper River region and lives at Hodgson Downs or Miniyerri, an outstation near Ngukurr. He is a full traditional member of his clan group. In his earlier years he worked as part of the early surveying teams that passed through the Kintore area. During this period he used to ride camels. At one time he took a heavy fall and broke his arm. He attended school at Warburton and used to paint since his early childhood. Barney grew up and worked with all the eminent artists of the region. Barney leads a rich life, moving around his dreaming country in his role as a traditional man. Barney has been deeply immersed in his painting for a long time. He seriously became involved a considerable time before the acrylic movement of Papunya even began. He has learned the skills and techniques from a number of Traditional Aboriginal Artists. His country spans approximately some 150 Kilometres around the Macdonald ranges. This area encompasses many salt lakes and wells to the east and west of Kintore. Contained within this vast area of territory are a score or more of relevant traditional sites that he paints. Barney paints a number of dreaming stories and idepictions of the Tingarri cycle of the Macdonald Ranges and Tjukurla. Barney uses different techniques when painting. One style incorporates the use of roundels in dot form or in block form whilst his other style incorporates the use of the above together with an arrangement of stripes across the canvas. These bands of colour may be placed across the work at oblique angles, giving the work a stunning appearance. These stories have been handed down to Barney by his grandfather and his father from generation to generation for many thousands of years. He must now keep these stories and pass them on to future generations so they may be preserved. Barney is a highly respected member of his people and follows a traditional lifestyle. He is very confident and proud when speaking of his traditional ways and is an ambassador of his people. His message is peace, harmony and happiness. Barney paints his dreaming stories totally naturally in a straightforward and delightful way. These qualities reflect his persona and acclaim the spirit of his family, his country and his people.
Betty Mbitjana
 
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Artist: Betty Mbitjana (c.1954 - ), Language: Anmatyerre, Region: Utopia, Central Australia. Betty is the daughter of well known artist, Minnie Pwerle (deceased) and sister of artist Barbara Weir. Her art is very collectable and she has grown in popularity in recent years. Betty’s Dreamings include Bush Berry and Bush Melon (Awelye).
 
Eddie Blitner
 
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George Ward
 
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George Ward Tjungurrayi was born in Kiwirrkura around the year 1945. George and his older brother, Willy Tjungurrayi, who is also a senior Pintupi painter, moved to Papunya in the 1960s. He was brought into Papunya in 1962 by the Northern Territory patrols which Jeremy Long was in charge of after watching local artists painting at that time. George began painting for the Papunya Tula Artists in 1976, at the West Camp of Papunya where the nomadic desert people stayed and at various locations, including Mt Liebig (Yamunturrngu) and Kintore (Walungurru), and the Yayayi and Waruwiya outstations, working alongside Joseph Jurra Tjapatjarri and Ray James Tjangala. His paintings are striking Tingari stories, done in linear optical stripes and square patterns. The depictions and designs in his works have brought him into prominence and are now highly sought after by collectors and galleries worldwide. George currently lives at Wallangarra (Kintore), Northern Territory. He is brother to Natta Nungurrayi. His son is Jake James Tjapaltjarri also a collectible artist. George Ward is a reticent and silent Western Desert man. This cast of character can cause the odd practical problem, now that he has become one of the nation's most admired and most keenly collected artists: He's not at home in English; sees no merit in photographs; is uneasy in big, bustling towns like Alice Springs. "I'm a bush man, me," he insists, with a distinct, proud edge in his voice. George's father died while he was still very young. It was only in his teenage years that he first encountered Europeans, when a commonwealth welfare patrol came upon his family group camped by a desert waterhole. After travelling to the government settlement at Papunya, first home of the desert painting movement, Ward worked briefly as a fencer and a butcher in the community kitchen. He also met and married his wife, the somewhat formidable Nangawarra, a member of one of the desert's most dominant families. Once their first child was born, the couple moved west to Warburton, then on through the ranges to Docker River, to Warakurna and at last to the newly established Pintupi capital of Kintore, in the looming shadow of Mount Leisler, where they still spend time today. It was here, just over a decade ago, that Ward first painted on canvas: a handful of elegantly "classical" concentric roundel works from that time survive. But it was only over the past three years, after the death of his brother, Yala Yala Gibbs, a celebrated artist, that the responsibility to paint fall squarely on Ward's shoulders. By this stage, he was a senior desert man: He lived deep in the world of law. The canvases he began producing for Alice Springs-based Papunya Tula artists were like nothing else that had come before in the desert art movement: sombre, cerebral, full of grave intellect. One of George's most recent achievements is winning the prestigious 2004 Wynne Prize at the Art Gallery of New South Wales for his topographical depiction of the Western Desert. He has also exhibited in many galleries throughout the past decade. National Gallery of Victoria Indigenous Art Curator, Judith Ryan quickly caught their splendour. "He hit on this sophisticated, geometric, filled-in style almost at once," she says. "I have the sense that he began to paint only when he was ready, in full command of both story and country - and he seems able to harness considerable power and visual energy almost every time he approaches a large canvas." Once Ward has blocked out his painting's various fields, he fills each one with parallel lines, tight-drawn. They have the feel of contours, making up recurring patterns: wavy paths, tilted circles, chevrons. This underpainting process can be protracted. The work still bears no resemblance to its final form. Then he takes up his dotting stick. A transformation begins. At last, after several days of meticulous detailing, the shimmer of the finished surface begins to show. Ward's large-scale works depict the ancestral desert narratives, relating to the country west of Kintore - above all, the snake-rich landscapes around Lake MacDonald. But they are not maps, as much as expressions of a world, logic, a sense of how space is enlivened by spirit. Just as the creation journeys they refer to operate on many levels, so do the paintings: to the outside eye, they possess an austere beauty; when explained in detail, they can serve as visual clues to a complex story-system; but all the while their air of coherent depth comes from the underlying mental architecture of the desert world, most of whom have passed away. It describes journeys taken by the Tingari ancestors - men, women, children, dogs - who once moved through the landscape, but are all transformed, now, into rocks, or water-snakes. A cataclysmic storm fell down upon them: black clouds, rain, lightning. Gradually, a complex narrative emerges, which involves shifting of shapes, claypans formed by nose-blowing, descent of figures from the sky. Many things are said of Ward's canvases, both by him and by his immediate family. Ward's brother-in-law, Frank, for one, advises that the artist paints some canvases in a pinkish palette because the colour feels "strong and balanced", while the black colour is chosen because it's "good and healthy". Then again, black and pink stand respectively for winter and for summer landscape, and much more. Western eyes interpret differently, and notice other things. Anita Angel, curator of the Charles Darwin University Art Collection, and a prominent collector in her own right, greatly admires Ward, while gauging his paintings largely in formal terms. "It's instantly recognisable, he has a style, but it's more than just a style," she says. "He's coming from somewhere deep within his mind's eye. To draw out what he does. He's not experimenting, he knows exactly what he's doing; he has something to say about what he sees, and feels, and knows." Angel suspects a connection between Ward's spare imagery and the incisions made upon the material objects of desert culture: ritual items only vaguely known to outsiders. This obscure, shielded element that so clearly lies within Ward's work makes all the more striking his strong appeal to serious collectors of contemporary art. Melbourne Gallerist, Gabrielle Pizzi, who has included significant pieces by Ward in four recent shows, believes his work can jump the cultural divide because of his capacity to fuse the desert tradition with an individual, almost private quality. "He's got it," she says, "both the Pintupi grounding, and the genius to paint in ways that are innovative and exciting. He takes desert painting to another level. In the gallery people stop still in front of his works. They respond to the power, the purity and the intent."
 
Jeanie Daniels
 
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Jillian Daniels
 
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Judy Doctor
 
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Judy Watson
 
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About Artist: Judy Watson was born in 1925 at Yarungkanji, Mt. Doreen Station, at the time when many Warlpiri and other Central and Western Desert Peoples were living a traditional nomadic life. With her family Judy made many trips on foot back to (and lived for long periods at) Mina Mina and Yingipurlangu, her ancestral country on the border of the Tanami and Gibson Deserts. These places are rich in bush tucker such as wanakiji (bush plums), yakajirri (bush tomatoes), and wardapi (sand goanna). Judy still frequently goes hunting in the country west of Yuendumu, near her homelands. Judy was taught painting by her elder sister, Maggie Napangardi Watson. She painted alongside her at Warlukurlangu artists for a number of years, developing her own unique style. Though a very tiny woman Judy has had ten children, two of whom she has outlived. She is a woman of incredible energy and this is transmitted to her work through her dynamic use of colour, and energetic "dragged dotting" style. She is at the forefront of a move towards more abstract rendering of Jukurrpa by Warlpiri arists, however her work retains strong kurruwarri, the details which tell of the sacredness of place and song in her culture. Judy's Jukurrpa are Ngarlyipi (Snake Vine), Karnta (Woman), Mina Mina, and Kanakurlangu.
 
Kenny Wark
 
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Ken Wark was born around 1947 near the mouth of the Roper River in East Arnhem Land, where the river meets the Gulf of Carpentaria. This area is known as Dhuruputbi and the language is Balummumu/Djapu and his tribe is the Munungurr. Ken received no formal education and lived in isolation in this area all of his young life until the family moved to the nearest major town of Katherine. This lack of contact with "white civilization" in his formative years shows through in his paintings. He depicts in his paintings subjects which are often associated with hunting and gathering activities such as bush foods, birds, animals and reptiles. He paints in the so called 'X-Ray' style, with fine cross hatching (rrark) associated with Arnhem Land Bark Paintings. Ken says his father and grandfather (Doonji) have had the biggest influence on his work. From a young age Ken watched these two people paint and learnt from them and the dreamtime tales that their paintings conveyed. In later years Ken has been influenced by David Blanasi (deceased) and George Jungawanga, (Left hand George) in his work. During this period Ken served several years in the local Army Reserve. Through his art, Ken hopes to heighten the awareness of Aboriginal Art in the community at large. He also hopes his success as a painter will influence his children to emulate him. Ken's work is sold in Art Galleries throughout the Northern Territory.
 
Leanne Oldfield
 
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Leekisha Walker
 
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Lorna Naparrula-Fencer
 
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About Artist: Subjects and Themes: Yarla, Wapirti and Marlujarra. paints: Sweet potato,"ngalatji" little white flower, bush tomato, bush yam. Lorna Napurrula Fencer was born about 1924 at Yartulu Yartulu, and was custodian of inherited land, Yumurrpa, situated near Chilla Well, south of the Granites Mine Area of the Tanami Desert. In 1949 many Warlpiri, including Lorna Napurrula, were forcibly transported to the government settlement of Lajamanu at Hookers Creek, situated in the country of the Gurindji people, 250 miles to the north of their own country around Yuendumu. Lorna Napurrula nevertheless maintained and strengthened her cultural identity through ceremonial activity and art, and asserted her position as a prominent elder and teacher in the community. The travels of Napurrula and Nakamarrra kinship or "skin" groups were the inspiration for Lorna Napurrula's work, and she was custodian of the Dreamings associated with bush potato (yarla), caterpillar (luju), bush onion, yam and also bush tomato, bush plum, many different seeds, and, (importantly) water, for the Napurrula, Nakamarra, Japarrula, and Jakamarra skin groups. She began painting on canvas during the mid 1980's, prior to which, she painted on traditional women's coolamons and digging sticks for ceremony and for sale. Represented in the National Gallery, State Galleries and major private collections, Lorna's work has always been in strong demand, but with her final works, seemed to find a new freedom and joy of expression which radiated from her stunning canvasses . Lorna was renowned for her innate sense and use of colour, and her later canvasses seemed to explode with a vibrant, full palette of colour, bringing a new vision and understanding to the ancient Dreaming stories.
Mitjilli Naparrula
 
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About Artist: Mitjili Naparrula is a Pintupi woman born at Haasts Bluff in about 1945. She first began painting in 1993 for the Ikuntji Womens Centre. Mitjili paints her father's Dreaming, Uwalki, which is the story of the spear straightening ceremony as taught to her by her mother. Mitjili also paints the topography of her father's country with its pristine sandhills, shrubs and Uwalki Trees. Her family is one of great importance in the Aboriginal community of Papunya. Her mother is well known artist Tjunkayi Napaltjarri who was involved in the 'Minyma Tjukurrpa Project' and consequently became one of the principal women painters at Kintore. Her brother is the late chairman of Papunya Tula Artists, Turkey Tolson, also renowned for his artworks which are sought by investors all over the world. Mitjili was married to artist Long Tom Tjapanangka. Long Tom won the prestigious 1999 Telstra Art Award. Mitjili's sister is Wintjiya Napaltjarri and wife to Turkey Tolsen's father, Tupa.
Nellie Marks
 
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Ningura Naparrula
 
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Peggy Rockman
 
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Reggie Sultan
 
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Others
 
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Rex Wilfred Ref #RW1 Lennnie Harrison Ref #LH1 Lurick Fordham Ref #LF1 Wesley Willika Ref #WW1
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Meggerie Brown Ref #MegB1 Maria Brown Ref #BM1 Norman Wilfred Ref #NW1 Nabula Scobie Ref #NS1
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Noiga Pollard Ref #NP1 Gloria Petyarre Ref #GP1 Dorothy Napangardi Ref #LH1
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